Building a Winning Culture: Establishing a Clear Purpose

In previous posts I have looked at building safety and sharing vulnerability which are two components to building a winning culture. A winning culture is one where people want to work at the company they are at. It is where, in your personal relationships that people want to be with you.
The third component to building a winning culture is to establish a clear purpose. I clear purpose is critical to guide the actions and decision making within a company or in relationships.
As a personal business coach in The Woodlands and as a personal business coach in Houston, regardless of where I am at or who I have the privilege of collaborating with, establishing a clear purpose for what we wish to accomplish is critical to our success. In a company, establishing a clear purpose is like a lighthouse. It becomes a beacon of light to guide your thoughts and actions.
Establishing a clear purpose is critical to having a winning culture. First, with a clear purpose that involves others, you can focus on something bigger than yourself. People love to belong or be part of something bigger than themselves. As Helen Keller once said, “Alone we can do so little. Together we can do so much.” A clear purpose is the glue that bonds people together to accomplish something bigger and better than anything they could do on their own.
A clear purpose can be found in the mission statements of many organizations. For example: In Conroe, Texas, the mission statement for the city employees is: “To serve the citizens of Conroe and to exceed their expectations.” With a clear purpose, decisions affecting the citizens are filtered through the prism of their mission statement. And, as the city employees are out serving the citizens they are guided by the words: “To serve the citizens of Conroe and to exceed their expectations.”
In a winning culture, you may have the best processes, top product and great people. Yet, without a clear purpose, decision making over a period of time can take a good organization and turn it into a mediocre or failing one.
Establishing a clear purpose gives people not only a sense and belief that they belong to something bigger than themselves, it gives them guidance in direction, behavior and attitude as they go about their daily work. A clear purpose is like putting a rudder on the ship of business or the boat of your life. It gives you the ability to steer in a clear direction to having a winning culture and locating the harbors of success and profitability.

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Sharing Vulnerability-Building a Winning Culture

Here’s another look at sharing vulnerability to build on the previous post. A winning culture starts inside of you. Then, in your business and relationships you spread your beliefs about yourself, your world and most importantly how you care for others. Culture, in a business or in personal relationships, is defined by how you care for others.
One of the key components in building a winning culture with others is to create an atmosphere where you can share vulnerability. Sharing vulnerability is not easy for most people. If you share vulnerability you may say to someone, “I don’t know.” Or, “I need your help.” Another way to share vulnerability is to ask for someone’s opinion or expertise. You are not asking for direct help in this case. You want their opinion to help you gain clarity on something where you are stuck or confused.
But when you share your vulnerability is this truly sharing vulnerability. There is a subtle yet important difference. The answer when it comes to sharing vulnerability is that both parties have to show vulnerability.
I have the privilege of doing business coaching in The Woodlands and business coaching in Houston. I also have clients out of town that I collaborate with on the phone. Much of the progress in the coaching relationship comes when we, the client and I, share our vulnerabilities. If one person shares their vulnerability and the other person does not acknowledge it, then the vulnerability is not shared.
For example, much of what I do is personal development business coaching. I collaborate with and support people who are already successful. True support that is focused comes from identifying and sharing our vulnerabilities. Notice, I said sharing our vulnerabilities.
A recent example was with a client who was having a challenge hiring the right people for his business. He shared with me his frustration and we delved into the root cause. When he shared his vulnerability in hiring with me. I acknowledged it and, this is very important, I shared my vulnerability that I had when I hired people for a company I built that had eighty employees.
I was always hiring out of neediness, not need. In other words, I would let things go too long. Then when the decision had to be made to fire a person, something that I tried to avoid, I was left with no options. As a result, I would hire the first person that might fill the job. This was not a process that gave me good results. I shared this with my client.
The result of my sharing my vulnerability led us into a deeper discussion of where he was vulnerable. Psychologically, when you do this, sharing vulnerability, you build a bond and trust that is unique. With this bond and trust very positive things can happen when you collaborate with others.
When you are a leader or not, sharing vulnerability is a very good way to connect with others and to build the trust and cooperation necessary to create a good culture with other people. Obviously, it is not something you do in every situation. Yet, if you are stuck in a relationship try sharing your vulnerability. If the other person picks up on it then you can take the relationship and create a culture of caring and trust.

If you are looking for self-improvement tips for success, next time you are having a challenge, share your vulnerability. When you do, you will increase the odds of creating a better culture based on trust and cooperation.

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Building A Good Culture: Sharing Vulnerability

One of the most overlooked attributes in building a good culture, mostly because leaders are not aware of it, is sharing vulnerability. They are not aware of it because it is counterintuitive. You are told that to be a good leader you must be strong. Yet, the strongest leaders are the ones who admit to and share their vulnerabilities.
What makes them stronger is several things. First of all, when you admit to your weaknesses, your vulnerabilities, you are showing self-awareness, and this causes others to see you as authentic and to trust you. Secondly, when you and your followers are aware of your vulnerabilities you can give those that support you responsibility for taking care of those things that are not in your strength zone. This gives them ownership which is important in creating a good culture.
The third point is that sharing vulnerability puts the first two together and sparks cooperation and trust. As a business coach in the Woodlands and a business coach in Houston one of the keys for me to be effective with my clients is that I must share my vulnerability. I must share where I am weak or uncomfortable or not a fit. Over the years, not when I was younger, I have become very good at being vulnerable. The result is that my self-improvement in the area of vulnerability has enabled me to support my clients more effectively.
Now when I share my vulnerability, most people pick up on it. And, the key is that when you share your vulnerability with someone that they know it. If they know it, then they are more likely to share their vulnerability. When they do, we have just created pathways that weren’t there before to work together. They have learned something about me where they can support me, and I have learned something about them where I can support them.
When this happens, a new bond of closeness and cooperation can be established. And it creates a new dynamic that can open up other avenues of cooperation and collaboration. In building a good culture, whether it be among two people or hundreds, the ability to share vulnerability and how we can support each other is critical to building a high performing team.
As an individual, in pursuing your own personal development or self-improvement, you are saying I am vulnerable in some areas and I will work to improve. If at first you are not vulnerable, you will not be able to improve.
In personal and business scenarios vulnerability does one other thing critical to the building of a good culture. It builds trust between individuals. After all, a team is nothing more than a collection of individuals. And, it is the trust between individuals on the team that very often can be critical to its success.
To build a better culture in your business and personal life, share your vulnerabilities. When you do, you will be gifting others with the opportunity to support and connect with you on a deeper level.

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