Building a Winning Culture: Establishing a Clear Purpose

In previous posts I have looked at building safety and sharing vulnerability which are two components to building a winning culture. A winning culture is one where people want to work at the company they are at. It is where, in your personal relationships that people want to be with you.
The third component to building a winning culture is to establish a clear purpose. I clear purpose is critical to guide the actions and decision making within a company or in relationships.
As a personal business coach in The Woodlands and as a personal business coach in Houston, regardless of where I am at or who I have the privilege of collaborating with, establishing a clear purpose for what we wish to accomplish is critical to our success. In a company, establishing a clear purpose is like a lighthouse. It becomes a beacon of light to guide your thoughts and actions.
Establishing a clear purpose is critical to having a winning culture. First, with a clear purpose that involves others, you can focus on something bigger than yourself. People love to belong or be part of something bigger than themselves. As Helen Keller once said, “Alone we can do so little. Together we can do so much.” A clear purpose is the glue that bonds people together to accomplish something bigger and better than anything they could do on their own.
A clear purpose can be found in the mission statements of many organizations. For example: In Conroe, Texas, the mission statement for the city employees is: “To serve the citizens of Conroe and to exceed their expectations.” With a clear purpose, decisions affecting the citizens are filtered through the prism of their mission statement. And, as the city employees are out serving the citizens they are guided by the words: “To serve the citizens of Conroe and to exceed their expectations.”
In a winning culture, you may have the best processes, top product and great people. Yet, without a clear purpose, decision making over a period of time can take a good organization and turn it into a mediocre or failing one.
Establishing a clear purpose gives people not only a sense and belief that they belong to something bigger than themselves, it gives them guidance in direction, behavior and attitude as they go about their daily work. A clear purpose is like putting a rudder on the ship of business or the boat of your life. It gives you the ability to steer in a clear direction to having a winning culture and locating the harbors of success and profitability.

Keywords: clear purpose, personal business coach in The Woodlands, personal business coach in Houston, winning culture, building safety, sharing vulnerability, lighthouse, alone we can do so little, together we can do so much

Sharing Vulnerability-Building a Winning Culture

Here’s another look at sharing vulnerability to build on the previous post. A winning culture starts inside of you. Then, in your business and relationships you spread your beliefs about yourself, your world and most importantly how you care for others. Culture, in a business or in personal relationships, is defined by how you care for others.
One of the key components in building a winning culture with others is to create an atmosphere where you can share vulnerability. Sharing vulnerability is not easy for most people. If you share vulnerability you may say to someone, “I don’t know.” Or, “I need your help.” Another way to share vulnerability is to ask for someone’s opinion or expertise. You are not asking for direct help in this case. You want their opinion to help you gain clarity on something where you are stuck or confused.
But when you share your vulnerability is this truly sharing vulnerability. There is a subtle yet important difference. The answer when it comes to sharing vulnerability is that both parties have to show vulnerability.
I have the privilege of doing business coaching in The Woodlands and business coaching in Houston. I also have clients out of town that I collaborate with on the phone. Much of the progress in the coaching relationship comes when we, the client and I, share our vulnerabilities. If one person shares their vulnerability and the other person does not acknowledge it, then the vulnerability is not shared.
For example, much of what I do is personal development business coaching. I collaborate with and support people who are already successful. True support that is focused comes from identifying and sharing our vulnerabilities. Notice, I said sharing our vulnerabilities.
A recent example was with a client who was having a challenge hiring the right people for his business. He shared with me his frustration and we delved into the root cause. When he shared his vulnerability in hiring with me. I acknowledged it and, this is very important, I shared my vulnerability that I had when I hired people for a company I built that had eighty employees.
I was always hiring out of neediness, not need. In other words, I would let things go too long. Then when the decision had to be made to fire a person, something that I tried to avoid, I was left with no options. As a result, I would hire the first person that might fill the job. This was not a process that gave me good results. I shared this with my client.
The result of my sharing my vulnerability led us into a deeper discussion of where he was vulnerable. Psychologically, when you do this, sharing vulnerability, you build a bond and trust that is unique. With this bond and trust very positive things can happen when you collaborate with others.
When you are a leader or not, sharing vulnerability is a very good way to connect with others and to build the trust and cooperation necessary to create a good culture with other people. Obviously, it is not something you do in every situation. Yet, if you are stuck in a relationship try sharing your vulnerability. If the other person picks up on it then you can take the relationship and create a culture of caring and trust.

If you are looking for self-improvement tips for success, next time you are having a challenge, share your vulnerability. When you do, you will increase the odds of creating a better culture based on trust and cooperation.

Keywords: self-improvement tips for success, business coaching in The Woodlands, business coaching in Houston, sharing vulnerability, culture, cooperation, trust

Self-Improvement Tips For Success from Personal Development Coach

“I must be the best me in order to be the best for everyone else.”-Steve Scott

I like this quotation, not because it is mine, but because it underscores a fundamental truth to self-improvement.  When looking at self-improvement tips for success, which means building your confidence and self-esteem you have to start with yourself.

You have to be the best you in order to be the best for everyone else.  If you are not the best you, or striving for it, what are you giving to others?  You are giving them something average or below average.  No one gets excited about the word “average.”

If people asked you the following questions with these answers ask yourself how motivated you would be to connect, partner or do anything with them.

  • How’s your life?  Average
  • How’s your business?  Average
  • How was your upbringing? Average
  • How are you doing?  Average
  • How are your relationships?  Average
  • How are your children?  Average

I think you get the point.  There is nothing exciting about “average.”  There isn’t anything there that brings, energy, excitement, and most importantly, momentum to ignite the power of creativity, excitement and forward progress.  Here is what is critical.  There is nothing in “average” to attract people who are “above average” into your life.

Life is not a one-man band.  It is about creating partnerships, sharing thinking and exploring new opportunities.  That’s what can make it above average when people see you, not as average, but as someone unique and exceptional.

So, start with yourself and be committed, not involved, committed to being the best you.  How do you do that?  You must be selfish.  You say, “Oh, people will think bad of me if I am selfish.”  They may and if they do, when you are being selfish in the process of being the best you, then they do not need to be a major part of your life.

Selfishness is, first and foremost, about self-preservation.  It’s meaning has been corrupted over time to mean something negative when someone wants something from you and when they don’t get it they tell you that you are selfish.

Sometimes, I am accused of being selfish.  When I am, I thank the person who says that.  “Thank you.  Yes, I am into self-preservation.”  Most people don’t get it let alone know how to handle it.

In my personal development coaching as a personal development coach I encourage all my clients to be selfish in order to be the best version of themselves.  In turn, they will be the best for others.  That is one of the most important self-improvement tips for success.